Monday, January 25, 2010

Mike-Gordon.com: MIKE GORDON MARCH 2010 TOUR


Mike and his band will embark on an 8-date March Tour beginning March 5th in Troy, NY and ending March 14th in Lebanon, NH.

The headlining club tour features a return to the Theatre of the Living Arts in Philadelphia and first time stops at Rams Head Live! in Baltimore, Jefferson Theatre in Charlottesville, and Revolution Hall in Troy.

Following three highly acclaimed tours in 2008 and 2009, in support of his album The Green Sparrow, Mike returns with the same five-piece lineup, including longtime collaborator Scott Murawski on guitar, Vermonters Craig Myers on percussion and Tom Cleary on keyboards and Brooklyn drummer Todd Isler.

A limited number of tickets are available via a real-time fan presale NOW at http://mikegordontickets.rlc.net. The presale ends Friday, January 29th at 5pm EST, at which point tickets will go on sale through traditional outlets.

Please visit the Tourdates page for complete details and ticketing info. Click here to watch the original tour announcement video.

MIKE GORDON MARCH TOUR 2010

3/05 - Revolution Hall, Troy, NY
3/06 - Toad's Place, New Haven, CT
3/07 - Sherman Theatre, Stroudsburg, PA
3/09 - Rams Head Live!, Baltimore, MD
3/11 - Jefferson Theatre, Charlottesville, VA
3/12 - Theatre of the Living Arts, Philadelphia, PA
3/13 - Pearl Street, Northampton, MA
3/14 - Lebanon Opera House, Lebanon, NH


MIKE GORDON MARCH TOUR 2010 from Phish on Vimeo.

Al.com: Solow-Auerbach duo blend 'Dead' with 19th century masters (Grateful Dead Content)


By Michael Huebner -- The Birmingham News

Birmingham Chamber Music Society events aren't likely to attract many Deadheads, but Jeffrey Solow might have drawn a few to Reynolds-Kirschbaum Recital Hall Sunday.

A succession of four Grateful Dead tunes arranged for solo cello, Aaron Minsky's "Dead Cello" was the centerpiece of a concert by Solow and pianist Elise Auerbach, both faculty members at Temple University in Philadelphia. "Dead Cello" came after Beethoven, and before Schumann and Chopin, but somehow fit nicely into the 19th century landscape.

Except for the subtle glissandos, "The Other One" could well have been composed originally for cello. "Dark Star" was driven by repetitive rhythms and underlined with open-textured double stops, "Stella Blue" given introspective warmth. "Truckin'" was the bluesy, upbeat finale, Solow dashing off triple- and quadruple-stop chords with ease. Read more

Video: Trey Anastasio 10/25/08 Cayman Review (HD)-The National Richmond, VA.

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